Goal of Lean manufacturing

The prime goal of Lean manufacturing is to continuously improve the quality, cost and delivery parameters for an organisation, thereby, enhancing customer satisfaction. “It is being individually focused, improving humanity and forming an organisational perspective to more effectively accomplish the mission,” believes Bremer. As per Grover, for too long, the goal of Lean has been improvement of manufacturing productivity and cost reduction. It has been a ‘Lean tools’ based approach. So, he suggests the addition of developing people—making them skilled, problem solvers and preparing to build a KAIZEN™ culture, to the existing goals.

Shariyarr explains it as ‘all stakeholder’s satisfaction’. He further opines that it should also achieve an intangible goal, i.e. continuously drive Lean thinking across the organisation since Lean manufacturing is not a one-time goal. “It has to be worked upon continuously involving all employees,” he says. According to Baitmangalkar, “With philosophy, processes, people and solving problems in a connected & continuous way, it will reduce waste paving the way for greater value addition & cost reduction.”

Lean is an end-to-end philosophy that starts from the customer and goes up to the last supplier and includes everything in between. “Many proponents of Lean advocate a process that people understand as universal, and yet this has not produced true great Lean results. If there was a universal standard template, then you would only have Lean companies today,” believes Baitmangalkar. He further focusses, “Lean is a strategy subject, and its success lies in both strategy and the tactical execution of strategy.”

Highlighting the need to implement 5S and TEI (Total Employee Involvement) practices on the shopfloor, Shariyarr says, “5S should be implemented across shopfloors and become a part of our daily routine. TEI initiatives aim at creating a stress-free and fear-free environment for employees. These initiatives include two-way communication programme, KAIZEN™ programs, quality circle participation, bonding and recreational activities, etc."

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